About your Search

20130416
20130424
STATION
CSPAN 4
CSPAN2 4
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
LINKTV 1
LANGUAGE
English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12
on the books, now laws in our country. i think that's what we are going to have to do. we are going to have to find people, across the aisle, who we can work w. in order to pass legislation in this area of gun violence that will make a difference in the lives of millions of americans. >> mr. lynch. >> sure. i want to point out that we serve in the legislature with 435 members. you can't break for lunch without getting 218 votes. so whenever you hear a legislator saying i solve the cargo security issue, i'm responsible for port security even though i voted against t. i'm the one who is responsible for nuclear safety, i'm the one who did the assault weapons ban, look, the truth of the matter is ed has been on the side of big business. on ast at that -- 1/2 25 -- nafta on fishing rights, i'm with the fishermen, you're with the fish. on the banking issues, i'm with the taxpayers, and the people of america, you're with the big banks and the bailout. on all these issues on the telecommunications, you're with the telecommunications companies. >> that's quite a laundry list. let him respond. >> tha
tragedy to a law office in san francisco in 1993. where a crazed gunman -- i remember his name but i won't say it -- with an assault weapon killed eight people and wounded six. one of those people was a brave warrior who threw his body over the body of his wife, sacrificing his own life to save hers. now, that young man was one of my son's best friends, and i know personally how these horrific and senseless tragedies live on with the survivors. the parents, the spouses, the children, the family and the friends. it changes their lives and it pierces their hearts forever. so i've told you a couple of stories about california, but let me say this. let's look at what's happened across this nation since sandy hook. in the 120 days since sandy hook, more than 2,200 americans have been killed by gun violence. hardly anyplace was spared. now, we know there are many, many firearms in america. 300 million firearms in the united states. if you were to divide that up, that would be one gun per person. of course, there are many people who just have many, many guns. now, this is a 50% increase in the
locomotives. about half a billion dollars to be spent on these new locomotives. in that section of law, one sentence was added that said these must be 100% american made. no one was making locomotives in america before that. but siemens, the german corporation, one of the biggest manufacturers in the world said, oh, half a billion dollar well, can make locomotives in america, sure. in sacramento, california, they opened a manufacturing plant, probably somewhere between 200 and 300 people working there today manufacturing 100% american made locomotives and on may 134, three years after they began this process, the first 100% american made locomotive in probably more than a century rolled onto the tracks of america. we can do this. h.r. 549 will provide that opportunity, using american-taxpayer money. i have another bill that does the same for wind and solar projects. we can do these things and put our mind to it and get past this business of austerity. we cannot solve this problem of american jobs with an austerity budget. we see it failing here in europe and united states as the long-term u
a mome us for aoment longer. you said upwards of 1,000 law e area. every agency descended upon this small town of watertown, massachusetts. can you describe the scene. you said at one point it was kind of frantic and slowed down a little bit. how about now? >> apparently, we're told they just found another device down the road here. and they're coming back and forth with reinforcements coming in. whatever's happening is happening somewhere down the road there and, you know, we are blocks from getting down there because it is so dangerous and sort of unsecure at this point. but the huge law enforcement presence continues here and, obviously, it's not going to let up until they find this person who is at large. my hunch is that when the sun comes up, that helps law enforcement to find this person. right now, he's under the cover of darkness with weapons and it's a tense situation. and i think they're afraid he may break into someone's home. this is a man who if the charges are correct, has not hesitated to put a bomb near the feet of young children. so, he is considered very dangerous. >> b
will prosecute this terrorist through our civil system of justice. under u.s. law united states citizens cannot be tried in military commissions. and since 9/11 we have used the federal court system to convict and incarcerate hundreds of terrorists. >> stephanie: yeah, bill clinton was doing a pretty good job of that until george bush came in -- >> he mucked it up. >> you are welcome america. got rid of that surplus. >> stephanie: i was reading the parade magazine piece, on the libary. >> stephanie: yeah, i have a libary, and he hopes he will be remembered as an honest guy. [ buzzer ] >> stephanie: kind of the guy that lied us into iraq, but okay. an honest guy? that's the first thing he threw out there. i said this yesterday, he can't be charged -- lindsay, lindsay, talking to you. well-known southern bell he is an american citizen, you can't. >> and peter king is trying to move the goal post by saying the brought the battlefield to america. no, he's an american citizen -- >> he doesn't have an american name, because then -- because he talks weird with a weird accen
it into law. that undertaking and many others, john berry made a real difference of the more than 62,000 federal workers and everyone else who called my district home. just as we look to our federal workers to watch out for us, our federal workers look to john to watch out for them, to make sure they have a safe work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national z
that we all have given through congress. i don't know what the law is spent we will make a request on that and appreciate your follow up on it. we go now to karen bass of california. >> thank you, mr. chair. i want to congratulate secretary kerry on your appointment, and also join my colleagues in expressing my condolences. >> thank you. >> i look forward to working with you, and especially working with the committed men and women at the state department. i have to tell you that i've really enjoyed working directly with the state department and i'm honored to have an excellent pearson fell in my office who i am looking forward to continuing to work with me. as the ranking member of the african subcommittee all wanted to share with you several priority issues i hope you will consider. first of all come u.s.-africa trade relations. number two, the importance of development assistance programs, including global hiv/aids funding through pepfar. number three, support for peacekeeping operations. as you know the u.n. is considering establishing a peacekeeping force and mali and there's a
immigration laws, i believe that i.c.e. will play a critical role. these reductions there could undermine our efforts to implement new reforms. i'm sure we'll revisit this during the course of the hearing. we also need to do a better job of managing our detention efforts to ensure that criminals are kept off the streets while acknowledging that the squeft ration that congress -- esqueft ration that congress launch -- sequestration that congress launched is partly to blame. another area of concern is the $714 million request to fund the construction of the national bio anding a row defense facilities in kansas. we've talked about. this i'm sure we'll talk about it more today the and i understand the importance of studying animal diseases, but i hope we can avoid providing full funding, $700 million some, full funding, to 2014 alone, for a multi-year construction probably. y building a building in lodge cal segments, taking away resources from other facilities like i.c.e. and the coast guard and fema, maybe even management moneys that we need from the department. and finally, i'm concerned by p
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
of her mother-in-law's house? >> you knew that linda was frustrated about the living situation, and those are words that you have used, correct? >> yes, she was frustrated. >> she shared that frustration with you, didn't she? >> yes, she did. >> coffman seethed and side, appalled at what was being suggested. >> i'm like, dude, you're so far off base that i can't even answer your questions with anger. so i'm just going to answer your questions. >> but it wasn't just a motive, the defense said. wasn't it also clear that linda had survived whatever had happened to john? since she was the one handwriting experts had said had sent postcards to friends weeks later from paris. >> linda sohus is the writer of the two postcards that you examined? >> yes. >> that supports the theory that linda was alive after the death of john sohus. >> as for the testimony of sandra boss, tales that seemed to suggest their client was the most clever conman alive, well, why would so nimble a schemer commit such a crude murder, burying his victim's remains in plastic book bags from universities he'd attended? >> tha
a lemon empire. it all started back in 2004, when zoning laws prohibited her from building on her backyard land, so she built an orchard instead, an orchard that was inspired by one famous lady. >> i love meyer lemons. i have always--from the very first time i tasted one, i thought it was the most wonderful thing i'd ever tasted. so i was looking at this big backyard full of weeds, and i thought, you know what? if martha is using--martha stewart is using meyer lemons, i bet you i could grow meyer lemons and sell them online. >> indeed, since martha stewart began using meyer lemons in the nineties, their notoriety has exploded. thin-skinned and slightly less acidic than other varieties, meyer lemons are known as backyard lemons because they're usually too fragile to ship, so therefore they're not often sold commercially. so when karen planted 40 trees in her backyard, she hoped to sell a few to neighbors and friends maybe, but nearly 6 years and 80,000 lemons harvested later, and the backyard fruit has turned karen's backyard into a full-time farming profession. welcome to the lemon ladies
human rationality. people do all kinds of really stupid things. we enact stupid laws sometimes that a lot of people agree on more because certain interest groups influence others. look at the gun legislation. yeah it's for the failure to enact it is driven by the economic interest of a certain small bunch of businesses but is that really why a huge number of other individuals who believe that's a good thing to do or wildly misinterpret the second amendment because they feel it within themselves. with regard to slavery and you jumped off from that, one of the things that became and has become clear to me the more i have delved into the world of the slave owner it's self and indeed the pre-emancipation north where it wasn't really all that different, is that a lot of people really liked slavery. they liked it. yes it was profitable but it wasn't always all that profitable and a motivator particularly in the 19th century was much of the south it was up into the respectable middle class to own a slave. it gave you a status in the stature that you might not have otherwise so why did
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12